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Table 4 Associations between nighttime eating and breast cancer stratified by BMI

From: Nighttime eating and breast cancer among Chinese women in Hong Kong

Variables BMI <25 BMI ≥25 Interaction
by BMI status
Case participants
(n = 533)
Controls
(n = 581)
OR (95% CI)a Case participants
(n = 250)
Controls
(n = 202)
OR (95% CI)a
Nighttime eating after 10 p.m.
 Never 434 502 1.00 (ref) 205 158 1.00 (ref)  
 Ever 99 79 2.29 (1.48–3.52)* 45 44 0.65 (0.36–1.18) 0.01
Meal type
 Never 434 502 1.00 (ref) 205 158 1.00 (ref)  
 Staple food 81 51 3.30 (1.95–5.59)* 34 25 0.85 (0.40–1.79) 0.03
 Snacks 23 30 1.26 (0.62–2.57) 12 20 0.38 (0.16–0.93)* 0.20
Food type
 Never 434 502 1.00 (ref) 205 158 1.00 (ref)  
 Noodles 44 26 4.07 (2.02–8.20)* 20 10 1.01 (0.35–2.95) 0.27
 Rice 39 20 4.41 (2.05–9.49)* 15 13 0.85 (0.30–2.36) 0.09
 Baked goods 21 23 1.81 (0.88–3.73) 8 9 0.46 (0.15–1.38) 0.21
 Meat 20 12 3.14 (1.25–7.88)* 9 9 0.51 (0.14–1.86) 0.12
 Vegetable 14 12 1.68 (0.64–4.38) 10 7 0.88 (0.22–3.57) 0.81
 Fruit 10 7 2.98 (1.02–8.72)* 1 6 0.13 (0.01–1.20) 0.08
  1. aAdjusted for age at interview, age at menarche, age at first birth, first-degree family cancer history, shift work and other dietary factors (consumption of cereals, deep-fried foods, preserved meats and dairy products)
  2. *Statistically significant (P value <0.05). For “Interaction by BMI status”, P values in italics are statistically significant. BMI body mass index, ref reference